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How UAT Might Fit Into Agile

Posted by Scott Summers on 12/12/2019
The Manifesto for Agile Software Development is based on twelve principles:
  1. Customer satisfaction by early and continuous delivery of valuable software
  2. Welcome changing requirements, even in late development
  3. Deliver working software frequently (weeks rather than months)
  4. Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers
  5. Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted
  6. Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)
  7. Working software is the primary measure of progress
  8. Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace
  9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design
  10. Simplicity—the art of maximising the amount of work not done—is essential
  11. Best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organising teams
  12. Regularly, the team reflects on how to become more effective, and adjusts accordingly

It’s interesting that despite the first principle being; ‘Customer satisfaction by early and continuous delivery of valuable software.’ UAT, as we have traditionally known it, doesn’t fit well into an Agile delivery model. Many Agile teams dispense with UAT and rely more heavily on the Show and Tell session to get customer sign off. In Scrum, this is done in the Sprint Review Meeting and involves a demonstration of the user stories that have been delivered (according to the Definition of Done) in the sprint. One of the objectives is to elicit stakeholder feedback.

This is good practice, fosters collaboration and creates a high level of discipline while also meeting the objectives of the first principle. Product demonstrations should be interactive so that stakeholders have the chance to provide feedback however, I often wonder “Is this enough?”. Participants in the ‘Show and Tell’ and the Sprint Review Meeting should include, amongst others, the Product Owner, Stakeholder and Sponsors and Customers. However, in practise, I tend to find two problems;
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Topics: Agile,, Software Testing, User Acceptance Testing, UAT

Do You Test Like A User? Why Not?

Posted by Renée Elizabeth Mineart on 15/01/2019

If we were to visit the town where I grew up, I could take you to any place in that town without having to use Sat Nav. I wouldn’t even have to glance at Google Maps to find my way.

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Topics: Software Testing, User Acceptance Testing, UAT

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